BioCycle: Organic Waste Bans And Recycling Laws To Tackle Food Waste

We were recently featured in an article in BioCycle magazine about our efforts to tackle the issue of food waste.

“The Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC), with support from the Center for EcoTechnology (CET), conducted an analysis of existing and proposed organic waste bans, studying the policies themselves as well as the experiences of states and localities in implementing and enforcing these policies.”

food

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Organic Waste Bans And Recycling Laws To Tackle Food Waste

published by BioCycle Magazine.

Wasting Food is a Waste of Money

Want to save money? Try looking in your refrigerator! According to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), American families throw out approximately 25 percent of the food and beverages they buy every year, which could cost a household as much as $2,275 annually! Wasting food means a waste of energy, water, and money. However, there are many ways that residents, customers, and businesses can help support the USDA and EPA goal to reduce wasted food by 50% by the year 2030:

Make Something New with Leftovers

One way to reduce wasted food is to check your pantry and refrigerator. Are there leftovers that could be repurposed? Check out the Save the Food campaign, which hosts resources to help communities and individuals address the importance of wasted food. For instance, Save the Food advises consumers on meal planning, understanding labels such as ‘best by,’ modifying storage practices, and reviving food. Also, read CET’s blog on best practices for storing and repurposing items past their prime. Reducing food ending up in your trash is a key way to saving money on grocery bills!

Get Involved with Food Rescue

Encourage local businesses to join Food Rescue programs, or volunteer as a food runner! For instance, MEANS database and Food Rescue US offer opportunities for local businesses, volunteers, and community kitchens or food pantries. Food rescue saves food that would have gone to waste, and feeds hungry people. By volunteering as a food runner you can give back to your community, and you can opt to volunteer whenever you are available.

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Learn How to Implement a Source Separation Program in Your School Cafeteria

The GREEN TEAM is a joint program of the Center for EcoTechnology and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) that empowers students and teachers to help the environment through waste reduction, recycling, composting, energy conservation, and pollution prevention.

The GREEN TEAM recently released an instructional video on source separation in school cafeterias. Source separation is a system by which organic material and recyclables are collected separately from the trash. This system makes recycling and diverting organic waste easier, which makes it more likely to be done. Recyclable material is then recycled and made into new products, and organic matter is composted, used to feed animals, or turned into energy through anaerobic digestion.

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NFL Tackles Waste at Super Bowl LII!

By Kevin Pink, Marketing & Development Specialist

This Sunday, the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles will square off in Super Bowl LII at U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. Players have been training for months, preparing to give it their best effort on the NFL’s biggest stage. But away from the cameras, another competition will rage. The NFL’s Rush2Recycle program will be taking on stadium waste. Its goal? To recover at least 90% of waste generated during the big game- over

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Is Your Christmas Tree Sustainable?

By Morgan O’Connor, Marketing and High Performance Building EcoFellow

Christmas TreeThis is a question we hear a lot this time of year. People often divide into two camps – artificial trees and living trees. There are a lot of factors that go into why someone chooses one over the other, some people have always grown up with living trees, others prefer the convenience of artificial trees, both of which are valid reasons, but it is important to clear up any misconceptions around which is more sustainable.

For the most part, choosing a real tree is better for the environment. It may be hard to reconcile this fact as you cut down a tree every year at the start of the Christmas season, but if you walked through the life cycle of an artificial tree it would be clear why. Artificial trees are commonly made of PVC, or polyvinyl chloride, which is listed as a carcinogen by the National Toxicology Program.

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