Get a Jump on Air Source Heat Pumps!

By Morgan O’Connor, Marketing & High Performance Building EcoFellow

In New England, heating our homes can become a lifestyle, whether it be chopping wood to stoke the fire, or incessantly monitoring the thermostat – we care about how much energy we use and know we’ve done well when we can see the change on our utility bills. That’s why Air Source Heat Pumps (ASHPs) could be a great option for you! ASHPs are not necessarily new, they’ve been certified with EnergyStar since 1995, but as technological advancements continue to improve their efficiency, they have become the cutting edge of heating AND cooling. That’s right – they can do both!

Can you find the ASHP in this modern home? They are discrete enough to hide in plain sight! Home by Jeremy Levine Design

What are Air Source Heat Pumps?

Air Source Heat Pumps are highly efficient heating and cooling devices that run on electricity. They work by taking heat from the outside air and moving it into the home in times of cold weather, but with a flip of a switch they can remove heat from your home and channel it outside. This is different than most heating systems, which have to generate heat before it’s able to be used, as ASHPs only move heat.

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Leyden Woods High Performance Building Case Study

By Aliza Heeren, Marketing and High Performance Building Fellow

Our High Performance Building team recently worked with The Community Builders (TCB) on the remodeling of their Leyden Woods Affordable Housing Development. For this project, CET provided 200 Home Energy Ratings and assisted throughout the construction process to ensure energy efficiency on all levels. We also provided guidance and certification services to help the project achieve ENERGY STAR for Homes Certification. Finally, CET helped TCB meet the guidelines to receive Mass Save Residential New Construction incentives that reflect the energy savings achieved in design and construction.

To learn more about this project and CET’s involvement throughout, watch our video case study:

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Home Energy Assessment Myths…BUSTED!

By Chiara Favaloro, Marketing Fellow

1. Myth: Home energy assessments are expensive

FALSE: They are available at NO COST to you! Trained professionals from the Center for EcoTechnology and Mass Save conduct each assessment thoroughly and skillfully.

2. Myth: Most homes don’t need weatherization 

FALSE: An average home has enough air leakage to add up to a two-foot-square hole. That is like leaving a medium sized window open for 24 hours a day!

3. Myth: Low-flow water fixtures greatly affect water pressure

FALSE: The water pressure is not significantly changed with low-flow water fixtures, yet you will greatly reduce your water consumption.

4. Myth: The savings are small

FALSE: You could save up to 30% on your energy bill by making efficiency upgrades that are suggested by your home energy assessment. Your report will also include applicable rebates and incentives, which could save you 75% up to $2,000.

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What You Need to Know About the New Massachusetts Energy Code

By Peggy MacLeod, Sales Representative, and Aliza Heeren, Marketing High Performance Building Fellow

As of January 1, 2017, the Massachusetts Energy Code has adopted stricter energy efficiency standards required for all new homes. The state base energy code transitioned from the 2012 International Energy Code (IECC) standards to the 2015 IECC with a few specific amendments for Massachusetts. In addition, the Massachusetts stretch energy code, which has been adopted by over 180 Massachusetts towns, made a huge leap from the 2009 IECC requirements to the 2015 IECC requirements. This stringent new standard asks a lot of building professionals, and the Center for EcoTechnology is available to help make the transition as seamless as possible. CET has years of experience in high performance building and has performed over 2,000 HERS ratings. CET experts are available to assist builders through IECC code trainings, consultations, and HERS services.

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Massachusetts Stretch Energy Code to Expand: What Does it Mean for You?

By Kevin Pink, Marketing and Development Specialist

Have you heard of the Massachusetts stretch energy code? Are you wondering what it is, and whether you need to think about it for new homes being built? Read on to expand your knowledge of stretch code, and what the coming changes mean for you!

Massachusetts has a base energy code that all buildings in the state must follow. It is based on the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)’s most current version and specifies certain standards that all building projects must achieve regarding their energy consumption.

The stretch code is an initiative adopted by many towns across Massachusetts requiring buildings to meet higher energy efficiency standards.

As of October 26, 2016, 186 Massachusetts cities and towns have adopted the stretch code- take a look at the map and list to see if your town is on it! As of January 1, 2017, twelve more towns in central and western MA will officially mandate the stretch code:

Agawam

Blandfordstretchcodemap

Charlton

Clarksburg

Erving

Fitchburg

Hawley

Plainfield

Southampton

Ware

Warren

Westfield

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