Food Waste Initiative Creates Jobs in Massachusetts

To help businesses and institutions maximize recycling, reuse, and composting opportunities, the Center for EcoTechnology administers a program called  RecyclingWorksMA for the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. The agency has just released a report highlighting the economic benefits in Massachusetts of food waste reduction initiatives. The following post, with a link to the report, was originally posted on the RecyclingWorksMA blog.

And continuing the theme of economic successes in the state that are linked to environmental and economic sustainability initiatives, the Mass. Clean Energy Energy just released it’s annual Clean Energy Industry Report, which describes significant growth in this sector over 2015!


Yesterday, December 22, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) released a new report highlighting the positive economic benefits of reducing food waste. This report studied the effects of the Massachusetts Commercial Food Waste Ban, which prohibits businesses and institutions that generate one ton or more of food waste per week from disposing of that waste in the trash. About 1,700 facilities such as universities, supermarkets, food processors, hotels, conference centers, and restaurants are subject to the ban. This ban, which went into effect in October of 2014, was the nation’s first requiring commercial entities to divert wasted food from disposal via donation, animal feed, anaerobic digestion, or composting.

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Federal Funds for Diversion of Food Waste in Connecticut

cet-logo    cee-logo

November 18, 2016

For Further Information:

Lorenzo Macaluso, CET, 413-218-1543

Dennis Schain, DEEP, 860-424-3110

 

Federal Funds for Diversion of Food Waste

Will Help Reduce Volume of Trash

Increase food donations is one of focuses – especially at holiday time

For many people in Connecticut, Thanksgiving is a time of family gatherings and enjoyable eating. It’s also a time when donations flood in from food rescue organizations to food pantries and soup kitchens, to ensure that the state’s hungriest people get warm, nutritious meals.

While Thanksgiving may put the spotlight on food insecurity, nearly half a million people in Connecticut, (according to the Connecticut Food Bank) including more than 140,000 children, do not have consistent access to adequate amounts of food year-around.

Meanwhile, nearly 520,000 tons of food waste is generated in Connecticut each year, some of which could be donated to feed people. Diversion from disposal of food waste in the State, be it by reduction of such waste in the first place, by donation to feed people or animals, or by composting and anaerobic digestion, is a priority noted in the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection’s (DEEP’s) recently adopted Comprehensive Materials Management Strategy (CMMS).

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EPA Awards $270K for Environmental and Health Projects in New England Communities

Contact Information: 

David Deegan (deegan.dave@epa.gov)

617-918-1017

BOSTON – EPA has awarded 12 grants across New England under its 2016 Healthy Communities Grant Program, totaling approximately $270,566, to fund community projects addressing environmental and public health issues. The projects will reduce environmental risks, protect and improve human health, and improve the quality of life for communities and residents across New England.

The Healthy Communities Grant Program combines resources from several EPA programs to strategically address the environmental and public health issues burdening New England communities. Contributing programs include Assistance & Pollution Prevention; Asthma; Children’s Environmental Health and Clean, Green and Healthy Schools Initiative; Toxics; Urban Environmental Program; and Water Infrastructure (Stormwater, Wastewater, and Drinking Water). The program has competitively selected projects that will: assess, understand, and reduce environmental and human health risks; increase collaboration through community-based projects; build institutional and community capacity to understand and solve environmental and human health problems; advance emergency preparedness and resilience; and achieve measurable environmental and human health benefits in communities across New England.

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Center for EcoTechnology Wins Environmental Business Council of New England Award

Primary Contact: John Majercak, President
413-586-7350 ext. 228 | john.majercak@cetonline.org

Secondary Contact: Emily Susan Gaylord, Marketing Manager
413.687.2132 (cell) | emily.gaylord@cetonline.org
 

Boston, MA – The Center for EcoTechnology was delighted to accept an award from the Environmental Business Council of New England (EBC) for their 23rd Annual EBEE Awards. The Center for EcoTechnology was honored on June 16 at the Annual EBEE Awards Celebration, held at the Marriott Hotel in Newton, Massachusetts. This recognition followed the Center for EcoTechnology’s Environmental Merit Award from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s New England regional office.

“Together with our partners we have been working toward reducing waste,” said Center for EcoTechnology President John Majercak. “Reducing food waste specifically has been an active part of our mission for a long time and we are encouraged by how much progress we have made.”

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Lauren Stevens Earns Center for EcoTechnology’s Local Environmental Leadership Award

Community leader, writer, educator, and outdoor enthusiast Lauren Stevens of Williamstown, Mass., has received the 2016 Alan Silverstein and Laura Dubester Award for Community Environmental Leadership from the Center for EcoTechnology.

Lauren StevensStevens, who has been working for more than three decades to protect and raise awareness about our local environment, received the award today, Wednesday, March 23, at a Berkshire Chamber of Commerce function at Crissey Farm in Great Barrington. Dubester and CET Associate Director Nancy Nylen were the presenters.

The award is named after Silverstein and Dubester, a couple who served as co-directors of CET for 22 years until they retired in 2010. Dubester joined CET in 1977 and Silverstein in 1978. They became co-directors of the organization in 1988. Silverstein passed away in 2014.

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