Creative Reuse Project: Make Your Own Paper!

Looking for a fun summer project? How about a family-friendly paper making activity! Paper making is a fun and interactive way to engage children in thinking about the paper recycling process and issues of waste reduction. This hands-on project demonstrates how used and discarded paper can be recycled into ‘new’ paper in order to conserve trees and save space in landfills. This is a great activity to do with children, but is fun for all ages! At the end of this rewarding project, each person will be able to make, decorate, and bring home their own hand-made piece of paper!

For this activity you will need:

  • Shredded or torn paper
  • Blender
  • Mold/Frame
  • Deckle/Screen
  • Roughly 3 gallons of water
  • A wide, shallow basin
  • Sponge(s)
  • Piece of cardboard or clean construction paper

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Pittsfield Elementary Schools Teaching Experience

For over 40 years, the Center for EcoTechnology has helped people and businesses save energy and reduce waste. Our mission is to research, develop, and promote those technologies with the least disruptive impact on the natural ecology of the earth. CET is a resource for objective information and guidance when it comes to navigating the world of energy efficiency, renewable energy, waste reduction, recycling, and composting.

One of the ways we accomplish our goals is to work with people of all ages and from all walks of life to educate and promote sustainable actions.

 

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Creative Minds Out Loud Podcast Episode: “Green is Good” with John Majercak

“[John Majercak] has worked for the Center for EcoTechnology for more than 25 years in a variety of positions and brings a positive vision, strong background in environmental science, broad experience, and a highly successful track record to the President position…John’s work in organic waste composting has garnered national recognition as a model for building a market-based system for diverting commercial food waste from disposal. Project work includes green job training for weatherization workers and public education on energy efficiency, radon and recycling.”

Hear the full podcast episode below:

Creative Minds Out Loud: “Green is Good” with John Majercak

Let’s Talk About Waste Reduction!

The Center for EcoTechnology has been a leader in the wasted food reduction and diversion movement for over 20 years. We believe that better managing wasted food is critical in order to address climate change, feed more hungry people, and grow our economy. We hope to offer you an informative description of the waste reduction programs we are involved in and events we have recently partaken in.

On Wednesday, October 17th, the Center for EcoTechnology (CET) Program Specialist Shomita Bhattacharya presented at the first ever Zero Waste Schools Coalition, arranged through the efforts of Wilton Go Green. The coalition took place at the Middlebrook Middle School in Wilton, Connecticut, and was formed to connect, learn, and share ways to introduce or enhance programming to reduce waste in schools. CET presented along with Chartwells Food Service, Wilton Zero Waste Schools Committee Members, Curbside Compost, and the Children’s Environmental Literacy Foundation. CET highlighted resources available to the Zero Waste Schools Coalition such as West Hartford’s Food Scraps Diversion Guidance document, Wasted Food Solutions, and grant opportunities.

Program Specialist, Shomita Bhattacharya, presenting at the Zero Waste Schools Coalition

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How to be a Smart Recycler

Massachusetts residents have long been known to recycle – in fact, a 2015 Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) report shows that nearly 95% of MA residents say they recycle on a regular basis! In the spirit of the new school year and starting fresh, we have some tips and tools on how to recycle even better and smarter in your home, business, or community.

What’s the deal with contamination?

You may have heard through the grapevine that there is a problem with contamination in our recycling industry. Contamination occurs when incorrect items are put in the recycling bin or sorted wrong. Down the line, this can lead to machinery malfunctions, increases in recycling costs, and unsafe work environments for the 13,000 MA employees working in the industry. This video shows the process of where your recyclables go after placed in your bin. When recyclables are contaminated, entire truckloads can be thrown away. The challenges of contamination have led to the implementation of China’s National Sword Policy. Some common contaminants include plastic bags and films, food waste, Styrofoam, and hazardous waste.

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