The EcoFellow Experience: Shelby Kuenzli

Hello! My name is Shelby Kuenzli and I am an EcoFellow at the Center for EcoTechnology.  My primary focus is helping the marketing team but I have also gained a lot of experience and knowledge in other facets of the organization, such as community outreach, commercial and residential energy efficiency programs and food waste diversion. I have loved working at CET for these past 6 months and I hope you’ll consider applying!

I am originally from Wisconsin and I graduated in May 2017 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I received a bachelor’s degree in Life Sciences Communication and a bachelor’s degree in Zoology. Throughout college, I worked as a communications assistant for a simulation-engineering lab and was the marketing director for the Journal of Undergraduate Science and Technology. I also conducted animal research and volunteered for the Undergraduate Zoological Society. I am passionate about sustainability and conservation and I want to communicate and connect these scientific topics to the general public and other audiences. This is one of the reasons I chose to apply to the EcoFellowship as it gave me the perfect opportunity to advance those skills and learn new ones!

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Smart Party Planning: How to Reduce Waste BEFORE your guests arrive!

By Shelby Kuenzli, Digital Marketing EcoFellow

Is one of your goals this year to help reduce waste? Try starting with food waste! According to the USDA, 30-40 percent of food produced in the United States every year goes to waste. This corresponded to about 133 billion pounds and $161 billion worth of food in 2010. Wasted food that is sent to landfills quickly generates methane, a greenhouse gas. About 20% of the country’s methane emissions come from landfills. Food waste is definitely a big deal!

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10 Easy, Green New Year’s Resolutions!

By: Shelby Kuenzli, Digital Marketing EcoFellow

It’s a new year! As everyone is setting their goals for 2018, here are a few easy and green New Year’s resolutions that can help you make an impact on the environment!

 

 

 

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EcoFellows Graduate from C2C Program at Bard College

By Shelby Kuenzli, Digital Marketing EcoFellow

This past week, four of the EcoFellows participated in the Bard College C2C Fellows Network program. This is a national program for undergraduates and recent graduates aspiring for leadership positions in sustainable policy, politics and business. This two-and-a-half-day conference provided a great opportunity for us to learn about potential sustainability career paths we can take as well as network with other young environmental professionals.

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Stop Plastic Pollution at the Source. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

Plastic PollutionBy Willow Cohn, Outreach and Education EcoFellow

We use plastics in virtually every shape and form in our daily lives. It carries our drinks, holds our shampoos, and keeps our veggies fresh. According to the to the UN Environment Programme, humans are consuming resources and producing waste at a greater scale than ever before, and per capita consumption levels are projected to increase with continued development. Data indicates that during the 20th century, global material resource use rose at about twice the rate of population. Plastic is everywhere! We love it because it is waterproof, relatively cheap, durable, and versatile. Plastic makes our lives incredibly convenient, disposable, and easy, but most people rarely think about the effects it has on the environment. Unlike other materials, it never really goes away. Plastic does break down, but in a landfill it takes up to 400 hundreds years; worse, it doesn’t ever become other materials, it just breaks into microscopic pieces of plastic that are still non-biodegradable. From there, plastic fragments most often find their way into the oceans. But it’s not just the end of a plastic’s life cycle we need to worry about. When plastic is produced, it’s made from toxic materials such as benzene and vinyl hydrochloride. These chemicals are known to cause cancer, and the manufacturing byproducts contaminate our air and soil.

So what can you do?

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