Fourth Annual EcoBuilding Bash Recap!

Thank you to everyone who showed up to our annual EcoBuilding Bash this past Saturday! We had a great turnout with over 200 guests in attendance. This event is our way of celebrating reuse and our customers, while also providing home improvement tips from industry experts.

We loved meeting our guests in the lumber yard where the grill was going all day, plus Powder Hollow Brewery provided excellent local craft beer. 

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Money and Energy Saving Tips for Spring Yard Work

The temperatures are rising and the flowers are blooming! With the longer days and warmer weather comes some yard work. While you’re getting your lawn and gardens ready for the season, we have a few tips that can help you save money while reducing waste and your carbon impact!

Compost yard waste

You’re going to be removing all kinds of carbon-rich “browns” from your yard. Thatch (a layer of dead organic material between the root and green parts of grass), sticks, dead leaves you didn’t clean up in the fall, and similar materials are great additives for your compost pile. You want three parts “browns” to one part “greens” (more recently-alive, nitrogen-rich materials, such as plant clippings) to keep everything decomposing well. You can add the finished compost to your garden soil or lawn later in the season to promote growth.

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Plastic Pollution Solutions: Working 9 to 5

We’ve already discussed how to end our plastic reliance in the home and in your children’s lives. Considering we spend a third of our lives at the office, it can be a significant investment to address plastic in the office culture as well. From cutlery to phones, plastic has integrated itself into every facet of our daily routine.

Regardless if you are an entry level employee or a CEO, there are ways to reduce the amount of plastic in your office and encourage more sustainable habits with your coworkers.

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Plastic Pollution Solutions: Keeping it Kid-Friendly

Earlier this week, we discussed the proliferation of plastic in the home. As the rate of plastic production and consumption increases, it becomes even more of a concern for future generations. Because most plastic is produced from chemicals derived from fossil fuels, it never truly breaks down or disappears. All of the plastic that has ever been created – over 8.3 billion tons – is still present in the world today, whether it is recycled or ends up in our oceans and waterways. Knowing that plastic pollution is a problem, it’s important to teach children about the importance of reducing, reusing, and recycling as much plastic as they can so that future generations can live in a cleaner and less toxic environment.

While kids definitely have a say in the food, clothing, and toys that they use, the majority of purchasing power lies in the parents’ hands. Here are a few actionable steps to limit the amount of plastic in the lives of your children:

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Plastic Pollution Solutions: Home, Sweet Home

According to the EPA, over 8.3 billion tons of plastic has been produced since the early 1950’s. That’s more than the weight of the entire human population! In 2015 alone, the US produced 34.5 million tons of plastic, including packaging, durable goods, and disposable items. The rate of plastic production and consumption has grown faster than any other material on the planet. This holds especially true for single-use plastics such as straws, silverware, cups, bags, and more, which for many of us, have become an integral part of our lives. Our plastic pollution problem is the result of consumption by manufacturers, processors, and residents.

Why is plastic a problem?

A 2017 study recently uncovered that only about 9% of plastics are truly recycled. The majority – almost 80% – accumulates in landfills or scattered around the natural environment. One of the most well-known end spots for plastic is in bodies of water, including rivers, lakes, and the ocean.The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the largest accumulation of ocean plastics on the planet. It totals 79,000 tons of plastic – over 94% of which are microplastics, pieces smaller than a grain of rice. If we maintain our current plastic consumption, there will be more plastic in our ocean than fish by 2050

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